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Managing Asthma

Asthma is a long term lung condition which can be controlled but cannot currently be cured.  People with asthma have sensitive airways which are more likely to react to triggers. The lining of the airways is thicker and inflamed.  When a person with asthma has an asthma flare up, the muscles around the airway squeeze tight, the airways swell and narrow and there is more mucus.  This makes it hard to breathe.  An asthma flare up can come on slowly (over hours, days or even weeks) or very quickly (over minutes) – a sudden or severe asthma flare up is sometimes called an asthma attack. 

The good news is, for most people, asthma can be well controlled by following a daily management plan.

If you think your daughter may have symptoms of asthma or hay fever, or if she experiences wheezing or coughing with hay fever, she should see the doctor and have these symptoms checked.  They will give you a proper diagnosis, help you get an asthma or hay fever action plan in place and make sure you’ve got the right medication.

If your daughter currently has asthma, you should have a regular review with her doctor about her asthma to ensure that she has the right medication and that she has good control of her asthma. It is also important that she has an asthma action plan and that you see your doctor to ensure that it includes advice for thunderstorm asthma. A copy of this should be uploaded to CareMonkey or a hard copy given to the Health Centre. Please remind your daughter to always carry her reliever medication with her.

 

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Asthma is a long term lung condition which can be controlled but cannot currently be cured.  People with asthma have sensitive airways which are more likely to react to triggers. The lining of the airways is thicker and inflamed.  When a person with asthma has an asthma flare up, the muscles around the airway squeeze tight, the airways swell and narrow and there is more mucus.  This makes it hard to breathe.  An asthma flare up can come on slowly (over hours, days or even weeks) or very quickly (over minutes) – a sudden or severe asthma flare up is sometimes called an asthma attack. 

The good news is, for most people, asthma can be well controlled by following a daily management plan.

If you think your daughter may have symptoms of asthma or hay fever, or if she experiences wheezing or coughing with hay fever, she should see the doctor and have these symptoms checked.  They will give you a proper diagnosis, help you get an asthma or hay fever action plan in place and make sure you’ve got the right medication.

If your daughter currently has asthma, you should have a regular review with her doctor about her asthma to ensure that she has the right medication and that she has good control of her asthma. It is also important that she has an asthma action plan and that you see your doctor to ensure that it includes advice for thunderstorm asthma. A copy of this should be uploaded to CareMonkey or a hard copy given to the Health Centre. Please remind your daughter to always carry her reliever medication with her.