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Science Week 2019

To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing, the theme for National Science Week this year was ‘Destination Moon: More Missions, More Science’. We started the week with a debate reviving the old conspiracy theory ‘Did We Really Land on the Moon?’. Passions were ignited and facts and evidence were exchanged. Students in the audience enjoyed watching our Year 12 debaters battle it out. Speakers in order of presenting on the affirmative side were our Debating Captain Annalise Skliros, Claire Garwoli and Jade Devlin. The negative side consisted of Olivia Graham, Eliza Kral and Charlotte Lack. To keep everyone in check, we were fortunate to have Becky Scott as our Debating Chair and adjudicator, and Anita Galli assisting. Olivia Graham was voted best speaker, however the affirmative team won the day. On the following day students were invited to learn more about the Apollo 11 expedition and the American astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins by viewing the documentary ‘Magnificent Desolation, Walking on the Moon’. This film includes historical NASA footage, taking us right back to that time in 1969.

No celebration is complete without dancing, and all students were invited to party at our Moon Music Disco in the Susan Alberti Auditorium. This event proved so popular that glow sticks ran out quickly. Mr Hanrahan was wonderful as our ‘bouncer’ at the door, taking his role way too seriously asking students for their ID and issuing stamps on entry. 

Back by popular demand, was ‘Ms Petch’s Incredible Science Show.’ Our college community was entertained with plenty of colourful, whizz-bang chemical reactions and Ms Petch’s well-crafted theatrical skills. Professor Julius Sumner Millar would have been very proud of our Ms Petch. 

Students also specifically requested the return of Liquid Nitrogen ice cream, but this year we included moon themed toppings. To receive a ticket for an ice cream, students needed to answer three questions related to this year’s Science Week Theme. The first ‘Who Am I Question?’ was about American Astronaut Michael Collins, who stayed in orbit around the Moon in Columbia, while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made the first crewed landing on the Moon’s surface in the Eagle space module. The answer to the second ‘Who Am I Question?’ was Jo Ann H. Morgan, the first female engineer at NASA and the first woman to serve as a senior executive at Kennedy Space Center. Jo Ann was in Firing Room Number 1 of Kennedy Space Center on the day of Apollo 11’s launch. It is reported that as a child, she preferred playing with a chemistry set her father gave her than playing with dolls. She even blew up the patio and cracked the concrete of her family home. For the third question in this competition, participating students listed one inspiring female Scientist in the field of Astronomy (or the Space Program) and gave a reason for their choice. We received close to fifty fabulous responses and listed below is a sample of some of these:

The woman I chose for my inspiring female scientist in the field of Astronomy is Maria Mitchell. She was born on August 1, 1818 and died on June 28, 1889. She is famous for discovering a comet in 1847 and it became known as the ‘Miss Mitchell’s Comet’. I chose Maria as my female scientist because it was a dream of hers to be an astronomer ever since she was young. She followed her dream and was able to succeed in living it out. It inspires me to follow my dream as well and not give up.
Callista Arief (Year 7)

Norah Patten, she is an Irish Aeronautical Engineer and an award winning STEM advocate from Ballina. She was born in Ballina and loved space as a child. The reason I have chosen Norah is because she is very inspiring. Her mission is to develop a community of STEM enthusiasts and to also inspire the next generation of astronauts, engineers, innovators and scientists. She is always on numerous radio programs to promote STEM and tell us she wants the next generation to love STEM and learn about it as she does.
Jordie Grant (Year 8)

Sally Ride, she is inspiring because she was the first woman in space. She travelled in the STS-7 Mission in June 1983 to the moon and became a role model for other aspiring young female astronauts.
Pia Perini (Year 9)

Nandini Harinath, she is an active member of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the deputy operations director of ISRO’s successful and remarkably cost effective Mars Orbiter Mission. Nandini is also a vocal advocate for female inclusion in the Space Exploration Industry.
Hannah Walsh (Year 12)

Thank you to all participants this year and we are already looking forward to Science Week in 2020.

 

 

 

go back

To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing, the theme for National Science Week this year was ‘Destination Moon: More Missions, More Science’. We started the week with a debate reviving the old conspiracy theory ‘Did We Really Land on the Moon?’. Passions were ignited and facts and evidence were exchanged. Students in the audience enjoyed watching our Year 12 debaters battle it out. Speakers in order of presenting on the affirmative side were our Debating Captain Annalise Skliros, Claire Garwoli and Jade Devlin. The negative side consisted of Olivia Graham, Eliza Kral and Charlotte Lack. To keep everyone in check, we were fortunate to have Becky Scott as our Debating Chair and adjudicator, and Anita Galli assisting. Olivia Graham was voted best speaker, however the affirmative team won the day. On the following day students were invited to learn more about the Apollo 11 expedition and the American astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins by viewing the documentary ‘Magnificent Desolation, Walking on the Moon’. This film includes historical NASA footage, taking us right back to that time in 1969.

No celebration is complete without dancing, and all students were invited to party at our Moon Music Disco in the Susan Alberti Auditorium. This event proved so popular that glow sticks ran out quickly. Mr Hanrahan was wonderful as our ‘bouncer’ at the door, taking his role way too seriously asking students for their ID and issuing stamps on entry. 

Back by popular demand, was ‘Ms Petch’s Incredible Science Show.’ Our college community was entertained with plenty of colourful, whizz-bang chemical reactions and Ms Petch’s well-crafted theatrical skills. Professor Julius Sumner Millar would have been very proud of our Ms Petch. 

Students also specifically requested the return of Liquid Nitrogen ice cream, but this year we included moon themed toppings. To receive a ticket for an ice cream, students needed to answer three questions related to this year’s Science Week Theme. The first ‘Who Am I Question?’ was about American Astronaut Michael Collins, who stayed in orbit around the Moon in Columbia, while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made the first crewed landing on the Moon’s surface in the Eagle space module. The answer to the second ‘Who Am I Question?’ was Jo Ann H. Morgan, the first female engineer at NASA and the first woman to serve as a senior executive at Kennedy Space Center. Jo Ann was in Firing Room Number 1 of Kennedy Space Center on the day of Apollo 11’s launch. It is reported that as a child, she preferred playing with a chemistry set her father gave her than playing with dolls. She even blew up the patio and cracked the concrete of her family home. For the third question in this competition, participating students listed one inspiring female Scientist in the field of Astronomy (or the Space Program) and gave a reason for their choice. We received close to fifty fabulous responses and listed below is a sample of some of these:

The woman I chose for my inspiring female scientist in the field of Astronomy is Maria Mitchell. She was born on August 1, 1818 and died on June 28, 1889. She is famous for discovering a comet in 1847 and it became known as the ‘Miss Mitchell’s Comet’. I chose Maria as my female scientist because it was a dream of hers to be an astronomer ever since she was young. She followed her dream and was able to succeed in living it out. It inspires me to follow my dream as well and not give up.
Callista Arief (Year 7)

Norah Patten, she is an Irish Aeronautical Engineer and an award winning STEM advocate from Ballina. She was born in Ballina and loved space as a child. The reason I have chosen Norah is because she is very inspiring. Her mission is to develop a community of STEM enthusiasts and to also inspire the next generation of astronauts, engineers, innovators and scientists. She is always on numerous radio programs to promote STEM and tell us she wants the next generation to love STEM and learn about it as she does.
Jordie Grant (Year 8)

Sally Ride, she is inspiring because she was the first woman in space. She travelled in the STS-7 Mission in June 1983 to the moon and became a role model for other aspiring young female astronauts.
Pia Perini (Year 9)

Nandini Harinath, she is an active member of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the deputy operations director of ISRO’s successful and remarkably cost effective Mars Orbiter Mission. Nandini is also a vocal advocate for female inclusion in the Space Exploration Industry.
Hannah Walsh (Year 12)

Thank you to all participants this year and we are already looking forward to Science Week in 2020.